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Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Park Honggu's vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations.

Korean Birch Half Charred Bowl

Regular price
$4,800.00
Sale price
$4,800.00
Regular price
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Artist: Park Honggu
Korean Birch
Dimensions: 12.5W x 5.75H

Master artist Park Honggu has been a woodworker for over half his life. His vessels are otherworldly – no machine is able to reproduce the delicate detail: the paper-thin edges and the kinks in the wood that have been shaved down to the exact right form. They perch on a svelte leg, and splay out, extending the arms of the bowl. The artist uses a traditional Korean lacquer process called Ott-chil – using the all-natural sap of a Rhus tree (lacquer tree) that is renowned for its high quality. An heirloom to be passed down for generations. 

The product(s) you receive might vary slightly from the product picture due to the nature of your product(s) being 100% handmade. Any item you purchase is one of a kind. There are no two items that are exactly the same. 

Care: This vase has not been treated for water. Please do not put water in the vase. Dust when needed. This piece has intentional color variation and cracks. Extremely fragile, please lift from below. 

Ship Date: Made to order. Please allow up to 90 days for delivery from your purchase date.

Space Honggu Studio

The Artist doesn’t need to leave his space to find a spark as even when his body is somewhere far, his mind stays in his work and his studio.

Master artist Park Honggu wasn’t always an artist by trade – in fact he spent his early adult years working in a factory, but, when his son was born, he wanted to show him that life had different possibilities. Park didn’t just teach his son – he lived by example. As Park says “I wanted my son to look over my shoulder and learn to live the kind of life he should live.” Park says that though he didn’t have money, he felt he could gift his son a life that was rooted in philosophy, art, and open mindedness. Through this process, Park fell in love with woodworking himself. (It’s no surprise the artist’s son is applying to art school in Europe). He doesn’t plan for what art he will create each day, but lives in the present – each day is to fulfill the desires of the day. Park only uses Korean wood. He appreciates that Korean wood faces each of the four seasons, as a human does, and because of this he has a fondness for Korean wood. Park sources his inspiration within his compound’s walls – from the dew, the sky, the blades of grass or the changing seasons. He doesn’t need to leave his space to find a spark as even when his body is somewhere far, his mind stays in his work and his studio.

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